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  • WW2 / 1957 GERMAN NAVY COASTAL ARTILLERY BADGE
    WW2 / 1957 GERMAN NAVY COASTAL ARTILLERY BADGE
    WW2 / 1957 GERMAN NAVY COASTAL ARTILLERY BADGE

    WW2 / 1957 GERMAN NAVY COASTAL ARTILLERY BADGE

    G1957031
    Reg Price:
    $106.00*
    Price:
    $111.00*
    • Quantity :
    Note : Price is inclusive of insurance*

    Prices shown are exclusive of Aust GST - GST only applies to Australian based buyers

    About this item

    WWII / 1957 GERMAN NAVY COSTAL ARTILLERY BADGE
    KRIEGSABZEICHEN FUER DIE MARINEARTILLERIE RARE ORIGINAL


    Scarce * WWII 1957 GERMAN NAVY COASTAL ARTILLERY BADGE * Guaranteed 100% original. These early badges are scarce and highly prized by military collector's worldwide.

    Made to comply with the new German laws of 1957 Without Banned Nazi Swastika, instead showing the history revised Oak Leaf.

    Awarded to German WWII combat Veterans' This type of German Order was re-awarded without the Swastika to those who served in WWII and then continued their military careers in the newly formed post WWII German (Bundeswehr) Federal Defense Force which was formed in the 1950's, now again proudly wearing these German Gallantry Orders on their military tunics, serving with allied NATO forces in the Cold War against the then Soviet Union. Also worn by veterans' to their once yearly unit Kriegs Kameraden reunions.

    Made by Steinhauer&L?ck, L?denscheid Germany the only German manufacturer that had the official German Government contract and licence to make all of Germany's national decorations. It is 100% Authentic. If it is not made by Steinhauer & Lueck in Germany then it is just a worthless copy, there are so many one piece cheap copies for sale worldwide, so please be careful and only buy a guaranteed original that actually has a real collector's value and will be a fantastic investment to your collection. This scarce Badge is in a very good condition

    HISTORY: One of the most interesting of the numerous ?"war badges? badges" instituted by the Third Reich is the so-called ?Kriegsabzeichen fuer die Marineartillerie? or the Coastal Artillery War badge.

    The German Armed Forces had long recognized the need for an effective force of ?Luftabwehr?Luftabwehr units to offer anti-aircraft protection for sensitive military and civilian areas. In this, the Germans were certainly not remiss in recognizing the danger of Air Forces. Their own ?Luftwaffe? had been created in secret, in defiance of the Versailles Accords, and when unleashed on Poland and the western European nations, it proved devastating.

    Thus it is not surprising that air defense should playplayed a pivotal role in German war operations. The navy or ?Kriegsmarine? had its own self-defense forces and by June of 1941, they were being officially recognized for their invaluable aid in downing enemy aircraft and suppressing raids on military objectives.

    Supreme Commander of the Kriegsmarine, ?Grossadmiral? Dr. h.c. Raeder established the Coastal Artillery War badge on June 24, 1941. In his laudatory comments preceding the official recognition of the badge, he addressed himself to the crews of the AA guns and spoke of their 'verantwortungsvollen und erfolgreichen Kampfes in der Luftabwehr' Citing the responsibilities and successful use of AA weapons, he acknowledged that the new badge would be offered to all members of the gun crews, regardless of rank.

    In addition to those who served the weapons, the badge could be issued to those killed in action during such service, those wounded in action or even those who had fallen victim to disease while on duty stations. As such, the new badge was truly ?"democratic,"? acknowledging the sacrifices of the naval anti-aircraft gun crews.

    A system of points was established for officially ?"winning? the right to wear this badge on the lower left breast of the tunic. One had to accumulate eight points: two points would be given to each gun crew for an enemy aircraft destroyed by their efforts; if they shared the ?kill? with another gun crew, each crew member received one point.

    Auxiliary personnel supporting the primary gun crews could also qualify for this badge but they accumulated only half points, thus making the acquisition of eight points a lengthier process than that for the active crews. In addition to points achieved for kills, the Germans also recognized gute Fuehrung, a term best translated as "leadership" in English. This also qualified personnel for the badge.

    In addition to points achieved for kills, the Germans also recognized  'gute Fuehrung' a term best translated as 'leadership' in English. This also qualified personnel for the badge.

    During the Polish Campaign of 1939, the badge was ?grandfathered? to include participation in action of Naval Assault Troops (Marinestosstruppkompanie). In the Norwegian Campaign, ground based ground-based Kriegsmarine personnel who manned cannon also qualified. Thus, by its inception in 1941, there were already many who had collected the necessary points or distinctions to proudly wear the badge. By 1943, Statutes regulating the badge admitted those who were both male and female auxiliary supporters of all ages which would of course, allow later HJ members to qualify for the badge. One expert notes that in some cases where merit was present but did not necessitate the issuance of the Iron Cross 1939 2nd class, the war badge was substituted for KM gun crews so it is quite possible that an exceptional deed, under 'gute Fuehrung' could bring the badge without any previous point qualifications.

    By 1943, Statutes regulating the badge admitted those who were both male and female auxiliary supporters of all ages which would of course, allow later HJ members to qualify for the badge.

    Initially the badge was made of brass:. examples exist of an alloy of tombak-bronze: ; most of the later badges were made of fine zinc. The original designer of the badge was the firm of Otto Placzek of Berlin. Initially the first badges were struck by the company of Schwerin & Sohn in Berlin but later examples bear other makers. One should note that most badges bearing an "RS" hallmark are considered suspect by many collectors. The original designer of the badge was the firm of Otto Placzek of Berlin.


* Note: prices shown above are exclusive of Aust GST - GST only applies to Australian based buyers